Calibers description

 

 

.22 Short
Produced since: 1857 .22_short
Type: Rimfire, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 0.695 inch
17.7 mm
Case Length: 0.423 inch
10.7 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.226 inch Bullet Weights: from 27 to 29 gr
5.7 mm 0.18 0.19 g
Base Diameter: 0.226 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 830 to 1164 ft/sec
5.7 mm 250 355 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.223 inch Muzzle Energies: from 44 to 87 ft-lb
5.6 mm 60 118 J
More Info
Developed in America in 1857, the .22 Short was America’s first metallic cartridge. It was originally intended as a self defense round in the first Smith & Wesson revolver. Although some pocket pistols are still made and chambered in .22 Short, it is now primarily used in rifles for hunting and target shooting. Although .22 Short rounds can be fired in rifles chambered for .22 Long Rifle, the results will lack accuracy as the shorter bullets of the Short round require a barrel twist of 1-in-20 or 1-in-24 whilst 1-in-16 is usual in .22 Long Rifle weapons. Loads for the .22 Short vary enormously but they typically produce 45-85 foot pounds energy.

 

.22 Long Rifle
Produced since: 1887
Type: Rimfire, straight
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 0.888 inch
22.6 mm
Case Length: 0.613 inch
15.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.226 inch Bullet Weights: from 29 to 40 gr
5.7 mm 2 2.2 g
Base Diameter: 0.226 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1040 to 1430 ft/sec
5.7 mm 316 435 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.222 inch Muzzle Energies: from 70 to 190 ft-lb
5.6 mm 95 257 J
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The .22 long Rifle (usually referred to as ‘.22LR’) was developed by the J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company in 1887 by combining the case of the .22 Long with the 40 grain bullet of the .22 Extra Long. Widely used as a training and hunting round, the .22LR is one of the commonest cartridges and is used all over the world. Most weapon types are available chambered for .22LR; pistols, revolvers, rifles and semi-automatic rifles. The cartridges are available in four velocity bands for different uses:
Subsonic (usually target or practise rounds): below 1,100 feet per second.
Standard-velocity (target and hunting rounds): 1,120-1,135 feet per second.
High-velocity (hunting rounds): 1200-1310 feet per second.
Hyper-velocity (hunting rounds): over 1,400 feet per second.

 

.22 WMR
Produced since: 1959
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.350 inch
34.3 mm
Case Length: 1.055 inch
26.8 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.242 inch Bullet Weights: from 30 to 50 gr
6.1 mm 2 3 g
Base Diameter: 0.242 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1800 to 2300 ft/sec
6.1 mm 550 700 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.224 inch Muzzle Energies: from 300 to 324 ft-lb
5.7 mm 410 439 J
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The .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire was introduced by Winchester in 1959. Smith and Wesson actually chambered a revolver in the calibre before Winchester introduced the Model 61 rifle well into 1960. The .22 WMR is really a dual-purpose round. In America it a reasonably effective personal defense round when chambered in small revolvers. It is also an extremely effective varmint round being suitable for animals such as crows, rabbits, groundhogs and even foxes and coyotes at reasonable ranges. Even though it is a rimfire round, reloading the .22 WMR is quite popular for silhouette shooting. The standard bullets aren’t heavy enough to knock over all the plates so the rounds are pulled before firing and 50 grain bullets are seated instead.

 

.17 HM2 (.17 Mach 2)
Produced since: 2004
Type: Rimfire, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1 inch
25 mm
Case Length: 0.714 inch
18.1 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.180 inch Bullet Weights: from 17 to 17 gr
4.6 mm 1 1 g
Base Diameter: 0.226 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 2100 to 2100 ft/sec
5.7 mm 640 640 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.172 inch Muzzle Energies: from 166 to 166 ft-lb
4.4 mm 225 225 J
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The .17 Hornady Mach 2 was introduced by Hornady in 2004. It is based on the .22 Stinger case necked down to .17 and typically fires a 17 grain bullet. The bullets are a ballistic tipped full metal jacket round that is quite challenging to produce, hence the relative expense of the ammunition. The extreme speed (around 2,100 feet per second) of the tiny rounds makes it quite flat shooting and ideal for vermin control out to around 150 yards. Because the .17 HM2 was introduced after the hugely successful .17 HMR, it is proving slower to catch on as the HMR does a similar job but better. The .17 HM2 typically produces around 165 foot pounds energy.

 

.17 HMR
Produced since: 2002
Type: Rimfire, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.349 inch
34.3 mm
Case Length: 1.058 inch
26.9 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.190 inch Bullet Weights: from 17 to 20 gr
4.8 mm 1 1 g
Base Diameter: 0.238 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 2350 to 2550 ft/sec
6 mm 720 780 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.179 inch Muzzle Energies: from 245 to 250 ft-lb
4.5 mm 332 340 J
More Info
The .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire (4.5×27mmR), commonly known as the .17 HMR, is a rimfire rifle cartridge developed by the ammunition company Hornady in 2002. It descended from the .22 Magnum by necking down the .22 Magnum case to take a .17 caliber (4.5 mm) bullet.
he .17 HMR round is similar to rounds developed by dedicated rimfire wildcatters who worked to create a rimfire cartridge with an exceptionally flat trajectory. These wildcatters were seeking to match the ballistics of the obsolete 5mm Remington Magnum Rimfire, which was made from 1970 to 1974, and was to that point the fastest rimfire cartridge ever produced.

 

.25 ACP
Produced since: 1908
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 0.91 inch
23 mm
Case Length: 0.615 inch
15.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.276 inch Bullet Weights: from 35 to 50 gr
7 mm 42037 3 g
Base Diameter: 0.278 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 760 to 1100 ft/sec
7.1 mm 230 340 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.251 inch Muzzle Energies: from 63 to 94 ft-lb
6.4 mm 85 127 J
More Info
The .25 (automatic)caliber was the smallest case Browning could use, and utilize primer pocket, and sufficient rim. The greased coated lead bullet design, standard for the .22 Long rifle of the day, was replaced with a copper jacketed round nose profile for more reliable feeding in auto loading pistols. The bullet weight was typically 50 grains, keeping with the sectional density of the 40 grain .22 caliber bullet. The cartridge is of semi-rimmed design meaning that the rim protrudes slightly beyond the diameter of the base of the cartridge so the cartridge can headspace on the rim. A recessed extractor groove allows an extractor to grab the cartridge reliably. It is the smallest centerfire pistol round in production, and is commonly chambered in small, so-called “vest pocket” pistols.
The .25 ACP achieved widespread use after Colt introduced the Browning-designed Fabrique 1905 Vest Pocket (sometimes referred to as 1906) to the United States as the Colt Model 1908 Vest Pocket.

 

.25 NAA
Produced since: 2002
Type: Semi-rimmed, bottleneck
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 0.960 inch
24.4 mm
Case Length: 0.745 inch
18.9 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.276 inch Bullet Weights: from 35 to 35 gr
7 mm 2 2 g
Base Diameter: 0.337 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1050 to 1200 ft/sec
8.6 mm 320 370 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.251 inch Muzzle Energies: from 90 to 120 ft-lb
6.4 mm 122 164 J
More Info
The .25 NAA was introduced by North American Arms company for their smaller (height: 1/4″ less; length: 1/3″ less) and lighter (by approx. 25%) .32 ACP Guardian model. It is a new design based on .32 ACP, but it is a rimless case necked down to accept .251″ diameter (.25 ACP) bullets and case is longer than a standard .32 ACP.
According to NAA’s website, the .25 NAA’s 35 gr bullet travels faster (1200 f.p.s.) and hits harder (20% more energy on average) than larger, .32 ACP caliber bullets.
The cartridge was originally conceived and prototyped by gunwriter J.B. Wood and called the 25/32 JBW. North American Arms and Cor-Bon Ammunition then further developed the cartridge and the NAA Guardian .25 NAA pistol combination for production in consultation with Ed Sanow. The finalized cartridge and pistol were introduced at the 2004 SHOT Show.

 

.32 ACP
Produced since: 1899
Type: Semi-rimmed, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 0.984 inch
25 mm
Case Length: 0.680 inch
17.3 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.3365 inch Bullet Weights: from 60 to 73 gr
8.55 mm 4 5 g
Base Diameter: 0.337 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 925 to 1100 ft/sec
8.6 mm 282 335 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.3125 inch Muzzle Energies: from 123 to 177 ft-lb
7.94 mm 167 240 J
More Info
.32 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol), also known as the .32 Automatic is a centerfire pistol cartridge. It is a semi-rimmed, straight-walled cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning, initially for use in the FN M1900 semi-automatic pistol. It was introduced in 1899 by Fabrique Nationale, and is also known as the 7.65×17mm .
The .32 ACP was intended for blowback semi-automatic pistols which lacked a breech locking mechanism. It was John Pedersen with the Remington Model 51 that delivered a true locked breech for the .32 ACP cartridge. The relatively low power and light bullet of the cartridge allowed Browning to incorporate a practical blowback mechanism in a small pocket-size pistol. It is still used today primarily in compact, inexpensive pistols, unless the pistol is used for ISSF competition where the cost then escalates. Cartridges in .32 ACP are also sometimes used in caliber conversion sleeves, also known as supplemental chambers, for providing an alternative pistol caliber carbine function in .30-caliber hunting and service rifles.
The .32 ACP is compact and light. While some believe it has marginal stopping power, it has been used effectively by military and police worldwide for the past century. Weapons chambered in it are often valued for their compactness. Although .32 ACP handguns were traditionally made of steel, they have been produced in light weight polymers since the 1990s. Their light weight, very low recoil and very good accuracy relative to larger caliber pistols make them sutiable for concealed carry use. Some popular pistols chambered in .32 ACP are the Walther PPK as well as the FEG PA-63, which is a clone of the Walther PPK.
Even though the .32 ACP is capable of killing small game, most handguns chambered for this round utilize fixed sights and are designed for use against human-sized targets at fairly close range, which greatly limits their utility as hunting handguns.

 

.32 S&W
Produced since: 1878
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 0.92 inch
23 mm
Case Length: 0.61 inch
15 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.334 inch Bullet Weights: from 85 to 98 gr
8.5 mm 6 6 g
Base Diameter: 0.335 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 705 to 705 ft/sec
8.5 mm 215 215 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.312 inch Muzzle Energies: from 93 to 115 ft-lb
7.9 mm 126 156 J
More Info
The .32 S&W cartridge was introduced in 1878 for the Smith & Wesson Model 1 1/2 revolver. It was originally designed as a black powder cartridge. The .32 S&W was offered to the public as a light, defense cartridge, for “card table” distances.
Originally designed as a black powder cartridge using 9 grains of blackpowder, the round has been loaded with smokeless powder since 1940. It is low powered and perfect for use in small frame concealable revolvers and derringers. The round remained popular in the United States and Europe long after the firearms for which it was chambered were no longer produced.
Although the .32 S&W’s round nose bullet was less than optimal for defense, it did offer significant improvement over these other common handgun calibers of the day.
This performance made the .32 S&W, sometimes referred to as .32 Short, very popular as a gentleman’s “vest gun”.

 

.32 S&W Long
Produced since: 1896
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.280 inch
32.5 mm
Case Length: 0.920 inch
23.4 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.337 inch Bullet Weights: from 85 to 98 gr
8.6 mm 5.4 6.2 g
Base Diameter: 0.337 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 718 to 765 ft/sec
8.6 mm 219 233 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.312 inch Muzzle Energies: from 99 to 117 ft-lb
7.9 mm 134 159 J
More Info
The .32 S&W Long is a straight-walled, centerfire, rimmed handgun cartridge, based on the earlier .32 S&W cartridge. It was introduced in 1896 for Smith & Wesson’s first-model Hand Ejector revolver. Colt called it the .32 Colt New Police in revolvers it made chambered for the cartridge.

 

5.7x28mm FN
Produced since: 1989
Type: Rimless, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.594 inch
40.50 mm
Case Length: 1.135 inch
28.83 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.25 inch Bullet Weights: from 23 to 21 gr
6.35 mm 1 2 g
Base Diameter: 0.311 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 2350 to 2800 ft/sec
7.9 mm 716 850 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.224 inch Muzzle Energies: from 344 to 400 ft-lb
5.7 mm 467 540 J
More Info
The FN 5.7×28mm is a small-caliber, high-velocity cartridge designed and manufactured by FN Herstal in Belgium. It is a bottlenecked centerfire cartridge that is somewhat similar to the .22 Hornet or .22 K-Hornet.The 5.7×28mm was developed in conjunction with the FN P90 personal defense weapon (PDW) and FN Five-seven pistol, in response to NATO requests for a replacement for the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge.
The 5.7×28mm cartridge weighs 6.0 grams (93 grains)—roughly half as much as a typical 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge—making extra ammunition less burdensome, or allowing more ammunition to be carried for the same weight. Since the 5.7×28mm cartridge also has a relatively small diameter, a relatively high number of cartridges can be contained in a magazine. The cartridge has a loud report and produces considerable muzzle flash (when fired from a pistol), but it has roughly 30 percent less recoil than the 9×19mm cartridge, improving controllability. Due to its high velocity, the 5.7×28mm also exhibits an exceptionally flat trajectory.

 

.32 NAA
Produced since: 2002
Type: Rimless, bottleneck
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 0.984 inch
25 mm
Case Length: 0.68 inch
17.3 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.3365 inch Bullet Weights: from 60 to 71 gr
8.55 mm 4 5 g
Base Diameter: 0.3740 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1000 to 1222 ft/sec
9.5 mm 300 372 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.3129 inch Muzzle Energies: from 158 to 199 ft-lb
7.95 mm 214 270 J
More Info
The .32 NAA is a cartridge/firearm ‘system’ designed and developed by the partnership of North American Arms and Corbon Ammunition. The cartridge is a .380 ACP case necked-down to hold a .32 caliber bullet with the goal of improved ballistic performance over the .32 ACP.
The .32 NAA is the most recent of a line of commercial bottleneck handgun cartridges. Renewed western interest in bottleneck handgun cartridges began with the .357 SIG in 1994 (necking a .40 S&W case down to a .355 bullet); followed by the .400 Corbon in 1996 (necking a .45 ACP case down to hold a .40 cal. bullet); and then the .25 NAA in 1999 (necking a .32 ACP case down to hold a .25 caliber bullet)

 

.22 TCM
Produced since: 2011
Type: Rimless, bottleneck
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.265 inch
32.1 mm
Case Length: 1.022 inch
26 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.255 inch Bullet Weights: from 40 to 40 gr
6.48 mm 3 3 g
Base Diameter: 0.378 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1900 to 2100 ft/sec
9.6 mm 548 630 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.224 inch Muzzle Energies: from 315 to 390 ft-lb
5.7 mm 427 530 J
More Info
The 22TCM (Tuason Craig Micromagnum) is a proprietary bottle-necked cartridge developed by Fred Craig and Rock Island Armory. Before the cartridge was commercialized, it was called the 22 Micro-Mag. Standard factory loads are 40-grain jacketed soft hollow point. Armscor has announced a new round the 22TCM9R which will be the same case as the 22TCM but have an overall length of the 9mmx19 round. The company plans to release this round in summer of 2015 with a Glock 22TCM9R conversion slide to allow the 22TCM to fit in a 9mm length magazine, hence the “9R” designation. The 22TCM9R will in fact still be a 40 grain bullet but will be a fully jacketed hollow point instead.

 

9x18mm Makarov
Produced since: 1948
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 0.984 inch
25 mm
Case Length: 0.713 inch
18.10 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.39 inch Bullet Weights: from 90 to 100 gr
9.91 mm 5.8 6.5 g
Base Diameter: 0.392 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1000 to 1050 ft/sec
9.95 mm 3019 305 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.365 inch Muzzle Energies: from 211 to 231 ft-lb
9.27 mm 286 313 J
More Info
The 9×18mm Makarov (designated 9mm Makarov by the C.I.P. and often called 9×18mm PM) is a Russian pistol and submachine gun cartridge. During the latter half of the 20th Century it was a standard military pistol cartridge of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc, analogous to the 9×19mm Parabellum in NATO and Western military use.
The 9×18mm Makarov round was designed by B.V. Semin in 1946, and was intended to be a relatively powerful round with modest bolt thrust that could function safely in a simple or direct blowback pistol. It was based on the 9×18mm Ultra cartridge which was developed in 1936 by Gustav Genschow & Co. for the German Luftwaffe, as a more powerful alternative to the 9×17mm used in the Walther PP, also a simple blowback design pistol. Nikolay Fyodorovich Makarov went on to design the Makarov PM pistol around the 9×18mm Makarov round in 1948.

 

.380 Automatic
Produced since: 1912
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 0.984 inch
25 mm
Case Length: 0.680 inch
17.3 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.373 inch Bullet Weights: from 90 to 95 gr
9.5 mm 5.8 6 g
Base Diameter: 0.374 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 980 to 1000 ft/sec
9.5 mm 300 300 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.355 inch Muzzle Energies: from 200 to 203 ft-lb
9 mm 270 275 J
More Info
The .380 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) pistol cartridge is a rimless, straight-walled pistol cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning. The cartridge headspaces on the mouth of the case. It was introduced in 1908 by Colt, and has been a popular self-defense cartridge ever since. Other names for .380 ACP include .380 Auto, 9mm Browning, 9mm Corto, 9mm Kurz, 9mm Short, 9×17mm and 9 mm Browning Court (which is the C.I.P. designation). It is not to be confused with .38 ACP, 9mm Ultra, 9mm Makarov or 9mm Parabellum.
As a service pistol round, its power did not provide suitable penetration for combat. It did find use as a backup gun due to low recoil, and is popular in the civilian market as a personal defense round.

 

.32 H&R Magnum
Produced since: 1984
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.350 inch
34.3 mm
Case Length: 1.075 inch
27.3 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.337 inch Bullet Weights: from 77 to 100 gr
8.6 mm 5 6 g
Base Diameter: 0.337 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 963 to 1227 ft/sec
8.6 mm 294 374 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.312 inch Muzzle Energies: from 170 to 324 ft-lb
7.9 mm 230 439 J
More Info
The .32 H&R Magnum is a rimmed cartridge designed for use in revolvers. It was developed in 1984 as a joint venture between Harrington & Richardson and Federal Cartridge. The .32 H&R Magnum is produced by lengthening the .32 S&W Long case by .155″, to 1.075″.
One of the .32 H&R magnum’s favorable attributes is that it offers .38 Special energy levels and allows a small-frame revolver to hold 6 cartridges, whereas a similarly sized revolver in .38 special would only hold 5 rounds. Penetration is also increased compared to the .38 special with bullets of the same weight.

 

.22 Hornet
Produced since: 1930
Type: Rimmed, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.72 inch
43.68 mm
Case Length: 1.403 inch
35.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.243 inch Bullet Weights: from 35 to 55 gr
6.2 mm 2 4 g
Base Diameter: 0.298 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 2652 to 3060 ft/sec
7.6 mm 808 930 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.224 inch Muzzle Energies: from 710 to 859 ft-lb
5.7 mm 960 1165 J
More Info
The .22 Hornet is a vermin, small-game and predator centerfire rifle cartridge. It is considerably more powerful than the .22 WMR and the .17 HMR, achieving higher velocity with a bullet twice the weight. The Hornet also differs very significantly from these in that it is not a rimfire but a centerfire cartridge. This makes it handloadable and reloadable, and thus much more versatile. It was the smallest commercially available .22 caliber centerfire cartridge until the introduction of the FN 5.7x28mm.
The .22 Hornet fills the gap between such popular varmint/predator cartridges as the .22 WMR and the .223 Remington.

 

7.62x25mm Tokarev
Produced since: 1930
Type: Rimless, bottleneck
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.34 inch
34 mm
Case Length: 0.98 inch
25 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.334 inch Bullet Weights: from 85 to 90 gr
8.48 mm 5.5 5.8 g
Base Diameter: 0.387 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1230 to 1720 ft/sec
9.83 mm 376 525 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.310 inch Muzzle Energies: from 290 to 560 ft-lb
7.87 mm 390 760 J
More Info
The 7.62×25mm Tokarev cartridge is a Russian bottle-necked pistol cartridge widely used in former Soviet satellite states, China and Pakistan among other countries. The cartridge has since been replaced in most capacities by the 9×18mm Makarov in Russian service.
The cartridge is in principle an enhanced Russian version of the 7.63×25mm Mauser. The Russians produced a wide array of loadings for this cartridge for use in submachine guns.These include armor-piercing, tracer, and incendiary rounds. This cartridge has excellent penetration and can easily defeat lighter ballistic vests (NIJ level I and IIA) as well as some kevlar helmets, such as the American PASGT helmet When fired from a carbine length barrel, such as the Soviet PPSh-41 or the Czech Sa 24 submachine gun, the cartridge may penetrate NIJ level II, but is readily stopped by the current standard armor NIJ level IIIA. Although most firearms chambered in this caliber were declared obsolete and removed from military inventories, some Police and Special Forces units in Russia, Pakistan and (mainly) in China may still use it because of the large quantity of stored ammunition available.

 

.32-20 Winchester
Produced since: 1882
Type: Rimmed, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.592 inch
40.4 mm
Case Length: 1.315 inch
33.4 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.327 inch Bullet Weights: from 85 to 115 gr
8.3 mm 5.8 7.45 g
Base Diameter: 0.354 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 900 to 1100 ft/sec
9 mm 270 340 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.3125 inch Muzzle Energies: from 207 to 228 ft-lb
7.94 mm 281 309 J
More Info
The .32-20 Winchester, also known as the .32 WCF (Winchester center fire), was the first small-game lever-action cartridge that Winchester produced. It was initially introduced as a black-powder cartridge in 1882 for small-game, varmint hunting, and deer. Colt produced a single-action revolver chambered for this cartridge a few years later.
The name .32-20 refers to the .32-inch-diameter (8.1 mm) bullet and standard black-powder charge of 20 grains (1.3 g).
Although the .32-20 cartridge was occasionally used for deer hunting in the past, many now consider it too light and low-powered for deer. Because of its low power, it destroys very little meat, making it a good hunting round for appropriately sized game, up to about 100 yards (91 m).

 

.218 BEE
Produced since: 1938
Type: Rimmed, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.70 inch
43.2 mm
Case Length: 1.345 inch
34.2 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.242 inch Bullet Weights: from 35 to 50 gr
6.1 mm 2 3 g
Base Diameter: 0.349 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 2654 to 3205 ft/sec
8.9 mm 809 977 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.224 inch Muzzle Energies: from 749 to 870 ft-lb
5.7 mm 1016 1180 J
More Info
The .218 Bee is a .22 caliber centerfire rifle cartridge designed for varmint hunting by Winchester in 1938. The cartridge was originally chambered in lever-action rifles, which may have ultimately led to its lack of popularity.
In terms of relative performance, the .218 Bee falls between the smaller .22 Hornet, and the larger .222 Remington and the more popular .223 Remington. In terms of short range velocity the .218 works quite well.

 

.38 Special
Produced since: 1902
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.55 inch
39 mm
Case Length: 1.155 inch
29.3 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.379 inch Bullet Weights: from 110 to 200 gr
9.6 mm 7.4 13 g
Base Diameter: 0.379 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 679 to 980 ft/sec
9.6 mm 207 300 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.357 inch Muzzle Energies: from 156 to 235 ft-lb
9.1 mm 212 319 J
More Info
The .38 Smith & Wesson Special (commonly .38 Special, .38 Spl, or .38 Spc, pronounced “thirty-eight special”) is a rimmed, centerfire cartridge designed by Smith & Wesson. It is most commonly used in revolvers, although some semi-automatic pistols and carbines also use this round.
Except for case length, the .38 Special is identical to that of the .38 Short Colt, .38 Long Colt, and the .357 Magnum. This allows the .38 Special round to be safely fired in revolvers chambered for the .357 Magnum, and the .38 Long Colt to be fired in revolvers chambered for .38 Special, increasing the versatility of this cartridge.
Noted for its accuracy and manageable recoil, the .38 Special remains the most popular revolver cartridge in the world more than a century after its introduction.

 

9mm Luger
Produced since: 1902
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.169 inch
29.69 mm
Case Length: 0.754 inch
19.15 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.380 inch Bullet Weights: from 90 to 135 gr
9.65 mm 5.4 9 g
Base Diameter: 0.391 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1200 to 1400 ft/sec
9.93 mm 377 426 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.355 inch Muzzle Energies: from 382 to 500 ft-lb
9 mm 518 678 J
More Info
Georg Luger developed the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge from his earlier 7.65×21mm Parabellum round, which itself was derived from the original 7.65×25mm Borchardt cartridge in the Borchardt C-93 pistol.
According to the 2006 edition of Cartridges of the World, the 9×19mm Parabellum is “the world’s most popular and widely used military handgun cartridge.” In addition to being used by over 60% of police in the U.S., Newsweek credits 9×19mm Parabellum pistol sales with making semi-automatic pistols more popular than revolvers. The popularity of this cartridge can be attributed to the widely held conviction that it is effective in police and self-defense use. Its low cost and wide availability contribute to the caliber’s continuing popularity.
The round was originally designed to be lethal to 50 m, but the bullet travels and is lethal at longer ranges. The 9 mm cartridge combines a flat trajectory with moderate recoil. According to the 1986 book Handloading: “the modern science of wound ballistics has established beyond reasonable doubt that the 9mm cartridge is highly effective.
After World War I, acceptance of the 9×19mm Parabellum chambering increased, and 9×19mm Parabellum pistols and submachine guns were adopted by military and police users in many countries. The 9×19mm Parabellum has become the most popular caliber for U.S. law enforcement agencies, primarily due to the availability of compact pistols with large magazine capacities that use the cartridge.

 

.327 Federal Magnum
Produced since: 2008
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.47 inch
37 mm
Case Length: 1.20 inch
30 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.337 inch Bullet Weights: from 100 to 115 gr
8.6 mm 6 7.45 g
Base Diameter: 0.337 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1300 to 1875 ft/sec
8.6 mm 400 571 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.312 inch Muzzle Energies: from 431 to 780 ft-lb
7.9 mm 584 1060 J
More Info
The .327 Federal Magnum is a cartridge introduced by Sturm, Ruger and Federal Cartridge, intended to provide the power of a .357 Magnum in six shot, compact revolvers, whose cylinders would otherwise only hold 5 rounds. The .327 Federal Magnum is actually a super magnum having replaced the .32 H&R Magnum as the pinnacle of the cartridge diameter.
According tests its provide better penetration and one more shot per gun load. It does all this with substantially less recoil and noticeably less muzzle blast than the .357 Mag.

 

9x21mm (IMI)
Produced since: 1985
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.171 inch
29.75 mm
Case Length: 0.833 inch
21.15 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.379 inch Bullet Weights: from 115 to 123 gr
9.63 mm 7.45 8 g
Base Diameter: 0.391 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1200 to 1300 ft/sec
9.93 mm 360 390 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.356 inch Muzzle Energies: from 382 to 420 ft-lb
9.3 mm 518 570 J
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The 9×21mm pistol cartridge (also known as the 9×21mm IMI or 9 mm IMI) was designed by Israel Military Industries for those markets where military service cartridges, like the 9×19mm Parabellum, are banned by law for civilian use, like in Italy.
Based on the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge, the case was lengthened from 19.05 to 21.15 mm (0.750 to 0.833 in). The bullet sits slightly deeper in the case, which results in almost the same overall length as the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge (29.69 to 29.75 mm (1.169 to 1.171 in)).

 

.38 Super Automatic
Produced since: 1929
Type: Semi-rimmed, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.280 inch
32.51 mm
Case Length: 0.9 inch
22.86 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.384 inch Bullet Weights: from 90 to 150 gr
9.75 mm 6 10 g
Base Diameter: 0.384 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1148 to 1557 ft/sec
9.75 mm 350 475 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.356 inch Muzzle Energies: from 439 to 497 ft-lb
9.4 mm 595 674 J
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The .38 Super or .38 Super Automatic (C.I.P. designation) is a pistol cartridge that fires a 0.356-inch-diameter (9.04 mm) bullet. The Super was introduced in the late 1920s as a higher pressure loading of the .38 ACP or .38 Auto. The old .38 ACP propelled a 130-grain (8.4 g) bullet at 1,050 ft/s (320.0 m/s). The improved .38 Super Auto pushed the same 130-grain (8.4 g) bullet at 1,280 ft/s (390.1 m/s). The .38 Super has gained distinction as the caliber of choice for many top pistol match competitors; it remains one of the dominant calibers in IPSC competition.
The cartridge was designed for use in the M1911 pistol and was capable of penetrating the body armor and automobile bodies of the time. When the .357 Magnum was introduced in 1934, this advantage of the .38 Super was no longer enough to lure police departments and officers from the traditional revolver.

 

.357 SIG
Produced since: 1994
Type: Rimless, bottleneck
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.140 inch
28.95 mm
Case Length: 0.865 inch
21.97 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.381 inch Bullet Weights: from 115 to 147 gr
9.68 mm 7.45 10 g
Base Diameter: 0.424 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1255 to 1550 ft/sec
10.77 mm 380 470 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.355 inch Muzzle Energies: from 510 to 614 ft-lb
9.2 mm 690 832 J
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The .357 SIG pistol cartridge (designated as the 357 Sig by the SAAMI and 357 SIG by the C.I.P.) is the product of Swiss-German firearms manufacturer SIG Sauer, in cooperation with the American ammunition manufacturer Federal Cartridge. While it is based on a .40 S&W case necked down to accept 0.355-inch (9.0 mm) bullets, the .357 SIG brass is slightly longer by 0.009 in (0.23 mm) to 0.020 in (0.51 mm) total. The cartridge is used by a number of law enforcement agencies (LEA) and has a good reputation for both accuracy and stopping power.
Developed in 1994, the new cartridge was named “357” to highlight its purpose: to duplicate the performance of 125-grain (8.1 g) .357 Magnum loads fired from 4-inch (100 mm) barreled revolvers, in a cartridge designed to be used in a semi-automatic pistol with greater ammunition capacity than a revolver. Performance is similar to the 9x23mm Winchester.

 

.40 S&W
Produced since: 1990
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.135 inch
28.8 mm
Case Length: 0.850 inch
21.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.423 inch Bullet Weights: from 135 to 200 gr
10.7 mm 9 13 g
Base Diameter: 0.424 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1050 to 1205 ft/sec
10.8 mm 320 367 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.400 inch Muzzle Energies: from 424 to 500 ft-lb
10.2 mm 575 680 J
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The .40 S&W (10×22mm Smith & Wesson) is a rimless pistol cartridge developed jointly by major American firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester. The .40 S&W was developed from the ground up as a law enforcement cartridge designed to duplicate performance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s reduced-velocity 10mm Auto cartridge which could be retrofitted into medium-frame (9mm size) automatic handguns. It uses 10.16-millimetre (0.4 in) diameter bullets ranging in weight from 6.8 to 13.0 grams (105 to 200 gr).
The .40 S&W cartridge has been popular with law enforcement agencies in the United States, Canada, and Australia. While possessing nearly identical accuracy, drift and drop, it has an energy advantage over the 9×19mm Parabellum, and with a more manageable recoil than the 10 mm Auto cartridge. Marshall & Sanow (and other hydrostatic shock proponents) contend that with good JHP bullets, the more energetic loads for the .40 S&W can also create hydrostatic shock in human-sized living targets.

 

.223 Remington
Produced since: 1957
Type: Rimless, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 2.28 inch
57 mm
Case Length: 1.76 inch
45 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.253 inch Bullet Weights: from 36 to 77 gr
6.4 mm 2 5 g
Base Diameter: 0.376 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 2750 to 3750 ft/sec
9.6 mm 840 1140 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.224 inch Muzzle Energies: from 1124 to 1333 ft-lb
5.7 mm 1524 1807 J
More Info
The .223 Remington is a cartridge with almost the same external dimensions as the 5.56×45mm NATO military cartridge. The name is commonly pronounced either two-two-three or two-twenty-three. It is loaded with a 0.224-inch (5.7 mm) diameter jacketed bullet, with weights ranging from 40 to 90 grains (2.6 to 5.8 g),[citation needed] though the most common loading by far is 55 grains (3.6 g).

 

.44 S&W Special
Produced since: 1907
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.615 inch
41 mm
Case Length: 1.16 inch
29 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.457 inch Bullet Weights: from 200 to 246 gr
11.6 mm 13 16 g
Base Diameter: 0.457 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 755 to 870 ft/sec
11.6 mm 230 270 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.430 inch Muzzle Energies: from 310 to 336 ft-lb
10.9 mm 420 456 J
More Info
The .44 Special or .44 S&W Special is a smokeless powder center fire metallic cartridge developed by Smith & Wesson in 1907 as the standard chambering for their New Century revolver, introduced in 1908.
Due to the lower energy density of the early semi-smokeless powders, prior efforts to convert the .44 Russian to smokeless had produced less than stellar ballistic performance. Smith & Wesson addressed this issue by lengthening the .44 Russian cartridge case design by 0.190-inch (4.8 mm), increasing the powder capacity by 6 grains (0.39 g). The resulting design, which S&W called the .44 Special, had a case length of 1.16-inch (29 mm).

 

.357 Magnum
Produced since: 1934
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.59 inch
40 mm
Case Length: 1.29 inch
33 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.379 inch Bullet Weights: from 125 to 180 gr
9.6 mm 8 12 g
Base Diameter: 0.379 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1240 to 1700 ft/sec
9.6 mm 380 520 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.357 inch Muzzle Energies: from 539 to 802 ft-lb
9.1 mm 731 1087 J
More Info
The .357 S&W Magnum (9×33mmR), or simply .357 Magnum, is a revolver cartridge with a .357-inch (9.07 mm) bullet diameter, created by Elmer Keith, Phillip B. Sharpe, and Colonel D. B. Wesson of firearms manufacturer Smith & Wesson, and Winchester. It is based upon Smith & Wesson’s earlier .38 Special cartridge. The .357 Magnum cartridge was introduced in 1934, and its use has since become widespread. This cartridge started the “Magnum” era of handgun ammunition. The .357 Magnum cartridge has a positive reputation for stopping power.

 

.45 ACP
Produced since: 1904
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.275 inch
32.4 mm
Case Length: 0.898 inch
22.8 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.473 inch Bullet Weights: from 185 to 230 gr
12 mm 12 15 g
Base Diameter: 0.476 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 830 to 1225 ft/sec
12.1 mm 250 373 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.451 inch Muzzle Energies: from 352 to 616 ft-lb
11.45 mm 477 835 J
More Info
The .45 ACP (11.43×23mm) (Automatic Colt Pistol), also known as the .45 Auto by C.I.P. or 45 Auto by SAAMI, is a cartridge designed by John Browning in 1904, for use in his prototype Colt semi-automatic .45 pistol and eventually the M1911 pistol adopted by the United States Army in 1911.
The .45 ACP is an effective combat pistol cartridge that combines accuracy and stopping power for use against human targets. The cartridge also has relatively low muzzle blast and flash, as well as moderate recoil. The standard issue military .45 ACP round has a 230 grain bullet that travels at approximately 830 feet per second when fired from the government issue M1911A1 pistol and approximately 950 feet per second from the M1A1 Thompson sub-machine gun.

 

.45 GAP
Produced since: 2003
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.070 inch
27.2 mm
Case Length: 0.755 inch
19.2 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.473 inch Bullet Weights: from 185 to 230 gr
12 mm 12 15 g
Base Diameter: 0.476 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 935 to 1150 ft/sec
12.1 mm 285 350 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.451 inch Muzzle Energies: from 447 to 543 ft-lb
11.45 mm 606 736 J
More Info
The .45 G.A.P. (.45 Glock Automatic Pistol) pistol cartridge was designed by Ernest Durham, an engineer with CCI/Speer, at the request of firearms manufacturer Glock to provide a cartridge that would equal the power of the .45 ACP, have a stronger case head to reduce the possibility of case neck blowouts, and shorter to fit in a more compact handgun. G.A.P. is an initialism for “Glock Automatic Pistol”, and the .45 G.A.P. is the first commercially introduced cartridge identified with Glock.

 

.38-40 Winchester
Produced since: 1874
Type: Rimmed, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.59 inch
40 mm
Case Length: 1.30 inch
33 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.416 inch Bullet Weights: from 180 to 180 gr
10.6 mm 12 12 g
Base Diameter: 0.465 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1160 to 1160 ft/sec
11.8 mm 350 350 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.401 inch Muzzle Energies: from 538 to 538 ft-lb
10.2 mm 729 729 J
More Info
The .38-40 Winchester is actually a .40 caliber cartridge shooting .401 caliber bullets. The cartridge was introduced by Winchester in 1874 and is derived from their .44-40 Winchester. This cartridge was introduced for rifles, but in its reintroduction for Cowboy Action Shooting it has seen some popularity as a pistol cartridge. It is not particularly well suited to hunting larger game, but it was popular when it was introduced, along with the previous .44-40 Winchester, for deer hunting. It can be used successfully on smaller game animals, and for self-defense. Current loadings are intended for revolvers.

 

10mm Auto
Produced since: 1983
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.260 inch
32 mm
Case Length: 0.992 inch
25.20 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.423 inch Bullet Weights: from 135 to 220 gr
10.74 mm 9 14 g
Base Diameter: 0.425 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1200 to 1600 ft/sec
10.80 mm 370 490 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.40 inch Muzzle Energies: from 703 to 806 ft-lb
10.17 mm 953 1093 J
More Info
The 10mm Auto (10×25mm, official C.I.P. nomenclature: 10 mm Auto, official SAAMI nomenclature: 10mm Automatic) is a semi-automatic pistol cartridge first developed by Jeff Cooper and introduced in 1983 with the Bren Ten pistol. Its design was subsequently improved, then produced initially by ammunition manufacturer FFV Norma AB of Åmotfors, Sweden.
Originally used in Bren Ten pistol the resulting cartridge—which was introduced in 1983 and produced since—is very powerful, containing the flat trajectory and high energy of a magnum revolver cartridge into a relatively short, versatile rimless cartridge for a semi-automatic pistol.

 

.400 Cor-Bon
Produced since: 1995
Type: Rimless, bottleneck
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.20 inch
30 mm
Case Length: 0.898 inch
22.8 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.423 inch Bullet Weights: from 135 to 165 gr
10.7 mm 9 11 g
Base Diameter: 0.470 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1250 to 1400 ft/sec
11.9 mm 380 430 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.401 inch Muzzle Energies: from 572 to 588 ft-lb
10.2 mm 776 797 J
More Info
The .400 Corbon is an automatic pistol cartridge developed by Cor-Bon in 1997. It was created to mimic the ballistics of the powerful 10 mm Auto cartridge by means of a .45 ACP case, necked down to 10.2 millimetres (0.40 in) with a 25-degree shoulder.
Peter Pi, founder of Cor-Bon and the designer of the cartridge, explained his reason for developing the cartridge: “Velocity is the key to making hollowpoint bullets work. The added velocity assures that the hollowpoint will open up even if plugged with material. This reduces the risk of overpenetration and allows the action of the hollowpoint bullet to dump the available energy into the target.”

 

.45 Colt
Produced since: 1872
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.60 inch
40.6 mm
Case Length: 1.285 inch
32.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.480 inch Bullet Weights: from 200 to 325 gr
12.2 mm 15 21 g
Base Diameter: 0.480 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 929 to 1325 ft/sec
12.2 mm 295 404 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.454 inch Muzzle Energies: from 473 to 1267 ft-lb
11.5 mm 641 1718 J
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The .45 Colt cartridge is a handgun cartridge dating to 1872. It began as a black-powder revolver round developed for the Colt Single Action Army revolver, but is offered as a magnum-level, handgun hunting round in modern usage. This cartridge was adopted by the U.S. Army in 1873 and served as the official US military handgun cartridge for 19 years. It is sometimes referred to as .45 Long Colt or .45LC, to differentiate it from the shorter .45 Schofield, as both were used by the Army at the same period of time. Colt pistols chambered in .45 Colt could use .45 Schofield ammunition.

 

.30 Carbine
Produced since: 1941
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.650 inch
41.91 mm
Case Length: 1.290 inch
32.76 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.331 inch Bullet Weights: from 110 to 110 gr
8.41 mm 7 7 g
Base Diameter: 0.354 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1990 to 1990 ft/sec
8.99 mm 606.5 606.5 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.308 inch Muzzle Energies: from 967 to 967 ft-lb
7.62 mm 1311 1311 J
More Info
The .30 Carbine (7.62×33mm) is the cartridge used in the M1 Carbine introduced in the 1940s.
U.S. Army specifications for the new cartridge mandated the caliber to be greater than .27, with an effective range of 300 yards or more, and a midrange trajectory ordinate of 18 inches (460 mm) or less at 300 yards. With these requirements in hand, Winchester’s Edwin Pugsley chose to design the cartridge with a .30 caliber, 100–120 grain bullet at a velocity of 2,000 feet per second (610 m/s). The first cartridges were made by turning down rims on .32SL cases and loading with .308 caliber bullets which had a similar profile to that of the U.S. military .45 ACP bullet. The first 100,000 cartridges manufactured were headstamped “.30 SL”.

 

.44-40 Winchester
Produced since: 1873
Type: Rimmed, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 1.592 inch
40.44 mm
Case Length: 1.310 inch
33.3 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.443 inch Bullet Weights: from 200 to 225 gr
11.3 mm 13 15 g
Base Diameter: 0.471 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 750 to 1245 ft/sec
12 mm 230 379 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.427 inch Muzzle Energies: from 281 to 688 ft-lb
10.8 mm 381 933 J
More Info
The .44-40 Winchester, also known as .44 Winchester, .44 WCF (Winchester Center Fire), and .44 Largo (in Spanish speaking countries) was introduced in 1873 by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. It was the first metallic centerfire cartridge manufactured by Winchester, and was promoted as the standard chambering for the new Winchester Model 1873 rifle. As both a rifle and a handgun caliber, the cartridge soon became widely popular and ubiquitous, so much so that the Winchester Model 1873 rifle became known as “The gun that won the West”.

 

.357 Rem Maximum
Produced since: 1983
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.990 inch
50.5 mm
Case Length: 1.605 inch
40.8 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.379 inch Bullet Weights: from 158 to 210 gr
9.6 mm 10 14 g
Base Diameter: 0.379 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1649 to 1998 ft/sec
9.6 mm 503 609 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.358 inch Muzzle Energies: from 1246 to 1548 ft-lb
9.1 mm 1689 2099 J
More Info
The .357 Maximum, formally known as the .357 Remington Maximum or the .357 Max, is a super magnum handgun cartridge originally developed by Elgin Gates as the wildcat .357 SuperMag. The .357 Maximum was introduced into commercial production as a joint-venture by Remington Arms Company and Ruger in 1983 as a new chambering for the Ruger Blackhawk.

 

.41 Remington Magnum
Produced since: 1964
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.590 inch
40.4 mm
Case Length: 1.290 inch
32.8 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.434 inch Bullet Weights: from 170 to 240 gr
11 mm 11 16 g
Base Diameter: 0.434 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1327 to 1871 ft/sec
11 mm 404 570 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.410 inch Muzzle Energies: from 890 to 1320 ft-lb
10.4 mm 1210 1790 J
More Info
The .41 Remington Magnum is a center fire firearms cartridge primarily developed for use in large-frame revolvers, introduced in 1964 by the Remington Arms Company, intended for hunting and law enforcement purposes.

 

.44 Remington Magnum
Produced since: 1955
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.61 inch
41 mm
Case Length: 1.285 inch
32.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.457 inch Bullet Weights: from 240 to 340 gr
11.6 mm 16 22 g
Base Diameter: 0.457 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1180 to 1500 ft/sec
11.6 mm 360 460 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.429 inch Muzzle Energies: from 741 to 1533 ft-lb
10.9 mm 1005 2078 J
More Info
The .44 Remington Magnum, or simply .44 Magnum (10.9×33mmR), is a large-bore cartridge originally designed for revolvers. After introduction, it was quickly adopted for carbines and rifles. Despite the “.44” designation, all guns chambered for the .44 Magnum case, and its parent case, the .44 Special, use bullets of approximately 0.429 in (10.9 mm) diameter.
The .44 Magnum delivers a large, heavy bullet with high velocity for a handgun. In its full-powered form, it produces so much recoil and muzzle blast that it is generally considered to be unsuitable for use as a police weapon. Rapid fire is difficult and strenuous on the users’ hands, especially for shooters of smaller build or with small hands.

 

.45 Winchester Magnum
Produced since: 1979
Type: Rimless, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.575 inch
40 mm
Case Length: 1.198 inch
30.4 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.473 inch Bullet Weights: from 230 to 300 gr
12 mm 15 19 g
Base Diameter: 0.476 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1150 to 1400 ft/sec
12.1 mm 350 430 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.452 inch Muzzle Energies: from 832 to 1001 ft-lb
11.5 mm 1128 1357 J
More Info
The .45 Winchester Magnum is a .45 caliber rimless cartridge intended for use in semi-automatic pistols. The cartridge is externally a lengthened .45 ACP with a thicker web to withstand higher operating pressures. The 45 Win Mag is nearly identical in dimensions and loading to the .45 NAACO developed by the North American Arms Corporation for their Brigadier pistol, developed to supply to the Canadian Army after World War II. The army ultimately did not adopt the pistol and its non-NATO standard ammunition.

 

.30-30 Winchester (7.62x51Rmm)
Produced since: 1895
Type: Rimmed, bottleneck
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 2.550 inch
64.77 mm
Case Length: 2.039 inch
51.8 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.330 inch Bullet Weights: from 110 to 170 gr
8.4 mm 7 11 g
Base Diameter: 0.422 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1616 to 2684 ft/sec
10.7 mm 493 818 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.308 inch Muzzle Energies: from 928 to 1903 ft-lb
7.8 mm 1258 2580 J
More Info
he .30-30 Winchester/.30 Winchester Center Fire (metric 7.62×51mmR) cartridge was first marketed in early 1895 for the Winchester Model 1894 lever-action rifle. The .30-30 (thirty-thirty), as it is most commonly known, was the USA’s first small-bore, sporting rifle cartridge designed for smokeless powder. In Mexico and Latin America, it is known as the treinta-treinta (Spanish for “30-30”).
The .30-30 is considered to be the “entry-class” for modern big-game hunting cartridges, and it is common to define the characteristics of cartridges with similar ballistics as being in “.30-30 class” when describing their trajectory. While it is very effective on deer-sized and black bear-sized game, most commercial loadings are limited in effective range to about 200 yd (183 m) for that purpose, except when using ballistic-tip ammunition. The cartridge is typically loaded with bullets weighing between 150 and 170 gr (9.7–11.0 g), but lighter loads are possible. Bullets of up to 180 gr (11.7 g) can be used, but the overall length restrictions of the lever-action rifles most commonly chambered for this round limit their usefulness.

 

.445 Super Magnum
Produced since: 1986
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.965 inch
49.9 mm
Case Length: 1.610 inch
40.9 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.457 inch Bullet Weights: from 240 to 300 gr
11.6 mm 15.5 19.4 g
Base Diameter: 0.457 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1300 to 1500 ft/sec
11.6 mm 396 457 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.453 inch Muzzle Energies: from 1045 to 1215 ft-lb
11.5 mm 1417 1647 J
More Info
Based on the .44 Magnum cartridge, a revolver designed for the .445 SuperMag can fire the shorter .44 Magnum, .44 Special, and .44 Russian rounds.

 

.480 Ruger
Produced since: 2003
Type: Semi-rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.650 inch
41.9 mm
Case Length: 1.285 inch
32.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.504 inch Bullet Weights: from 325 to 325 gr
12.8 mm 21 21 g
Base Diameter: 0.504 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1350 to 1350 ft/sec
12.8 mm 410 410 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.475 inch Muzzle Energies: from 1315 to 1315 ft-lb
12.1 mm 1783 1783 J
More Info
The .480 Ruger (12.1×33mmR) is a large, high-power revolver cartridge, introduced in 2003 by Sturm, Ruger and Hornady. This was the first new cartridge introduced by Ruger, and was at time of introduction the largest-diameter production revolver cartridge, at .475 in (12.1 mm).
Also, recently Smith & Wesson introduced its .500 S&W and .460 S&W Magnum cartridges; the 480 has fallen even further into obscurity as it could not compete with the glitz of these new mega-cartridges. Revolvers chambered in .460 S&W Magnum can usually accept .454 Casull and .45 Colt rounds as well (in the same way that a .475 Linebaugh revolver can take .480 Ruger), a useful cost-saving feature that can increase the appeal of the .460 over the .480 for some shooters, especially for practice sessions where full-power rounds are not necessary.

 

.50 AE
Produced since: 1988
Type: Rebated, straight
Made for: Semi-Auto
Overall Length: 1.610 inch
40.9 mm
Case Length: 1.285 inch
32.6 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.540 inch Bullet Weights: from 300 to 325 gr
13.7 mm 19 21 g
Base Diameter: 0.547 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1450 to 1550 ft/sec
13.9 mm 440 470 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.500 inch Muzzle Energies: from 1450 to 1600 ft-lb
12.7 mm 1970 2200 J
More Info
The .50 Action Express (AE, 12.7×33mm) is a large caliber handgun cartridge. It was developed in 1988 by Evan Whildin of Action Arms. The .50 AE is one of the most powerful pistol cartridges in production.
Like other handgun cartridges of such magnitude, the principal uses of the .50 AE are metallic silhouette shooting and medium/big game hunting. However, like the .44 Magnum, .454 Casull, .460 S&W Magnum, and .500 S&W Magnum, it is well suited for defense against large predators, such as bears.

 

.454 Casull
Produced since: 1959
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 1.77 inch
45 mm
Case Length: 1.383 inch
35.1 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.480 inch Bullet Weights: from 240 to 360 gr
12.2 mm 16 23 g
Base Diameter: 0.480 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1425 to 1900 ft/sec
12.2 mm 434 580 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.452 inch Muzzle Energies: from 1623 to 1923 ft-lb
11.5 mm 2200 2607 J
More Info
The .454 Casull is a firearm cartridge, developed in 1957 by Dick Casull and Jack Fullmer. Ruger began chambering its Super Redhawk in this caliber in 1997 and Taurus followed with the Raging Bull model in 1998 and the Taurus Raging Judge Magnum in 2010.
The recently introduced .460 Smith & Wesson Magnum cartridge has the same diameter as a .45 Colt or .454 Casull, and therefore revolvers chambered for it will also chamber the .454 Casull, .45 Colt, .45 Schofield and also use .410 gauge rifled slugs.

 

.460 S&W Magnum
Produced since: 2005
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 2.30 inch
58.4 mm
Case Length: 1.80 inch
46 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.478 inch Bullet Weights: from 275 to 395 gr
12.1 mm 18 26 g
Base Diameter: 0.478 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1525 to 2300 ft/sec
12.1 mm 465 700 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.452 inch Muzzle Energies: from 2034 to 2885 ft-lb
11.5 mm 2758 3912 J
More Info
The .460 S&W Magnum round is a powerful revolver cartridge designed for long-range handgun hunting in the Smith & Wesson Model 460 revolver.
Smith & Wesson says that the .460 S&W is the highest velocity revolver cartridge in the world, firing bullets at 2330 ft/s. With Buffalo Bore’s new loading, the .460 S&W can achieve nearly 2900 ft-lb of energy by driving a 360 grain bullet at 1900 ft/s. For comparison .500 S&W Magnum offers slightly more energy at the muzzle, driving a 350 grain bullet at 1975 ft/s for a total of 3031 ft-lb.

 

.444 Marlin
Produced since: 1964
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 2.55 inch
65 mm
Case Length: 2.250 inch
57.2 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.453 inch Bullet Weights: from 240 to 300 gr
11.51 mm 16 19 g
Base Diameter: 0.4706 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 2000 to 2350 ft/sec
11.95 mm 610 720 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.429 inch Muzzle Energies: from 2665 to 2942 ft-lb
10.9 mm 3613 3989 J
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The .444 Marlin is a rifle cartridge designed in 1964 by Marlin Firearms and Remington Arms. It was designed to fill in a gap for the older .45-70 at a time when that cartridge was not currently available in any lever action, making it the largest at the time available lever-action cartridge. The .444 looks like a lengthened .44 Magnum and provides a significant increase in velocity. It is usually used for the Marlin 444 Lever-action Rifle.

 

.45-70 Government
Produced since: 1873
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 2.550 inch
64.8 mm
Case Length: 2.105 inch
53.5 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.480 inch Bullet Weights: from 300 to 405 gr
12.2 mm 19.4 25 g
Base Diameter: 0.505 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1394 to 2275 ft/sec
12.8 mm 425 693 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.458 inch Muzzle Energies: from 1699 to 3449 ft-lb
11.6 mm 2304 4676 J
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The .45-70 rifle cartridge, also known as .45-70 Government, was developed at the U.S. Army’s Springfield Armory for use in the Springfield Model 1873, which is known to collectors as the “Trapdoor Springfield”. The new cartridge was a replacement for the stop-gap .50-70 Government cartridge which had been adopted in 1866, one year after the end of the American Civil War.

 

.450 Marlin
Produced since: 2000
Type: Belted, straight
Made for: Rifle
Overall Length: 2.55 inch
65 mm
Case Length: 2.10 inch
53 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.4808 inch Bullet Weights: from 405 to 430 gr
12.21 mm 26 28 g
Base Diameter: 0.5121 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1900 to 2225 ft/sec
13 mm 580 678 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.458 inch Muzzle Energies: from 3427 to 3572 ft-lb
11.6 mm 4646 4843 J
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The .450 Marlin is a firearms cartridge designed as a modernized equivalent to the venerable .45-70 lever-action cartridge. It was designed by a joint team of Marlin and Hornady engineers headed by Hornady’s Mitch Mittelstaedt, and was released in 2000, with cartridges manufactured by Hornady and rifles manufactured by Marlin, mainly the Model 1895M levergun. The Browning BLR is also now available in .450 Marlin chambering.

 

.500 S&W Magnum
Produced since: 2003
Type: Rimmed, straight
Made for: Revolver
Overall Length: 2.30 inch
58.4 mm
Case Length: 1.625 inch
41.3 mm
Neck Diameter: 0.526 inch Bullet Weights: from 300 to 700 gr
13.4 mm 19 45 g
Base Diameter: 0.526 inch Muzzle Velocities: from 1200 to 2075 ft/sec
13.4 mm 370 632 m/s
Bullet Diameter: 0.500 inch Muzzle Energies: from 2238 to 2877 ft-lb
12.7 mm 3034 3901 J
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The .500 S&W Magnum (12.7×41mmSR) is a fifty-caliber semi-rimmed handgun cartridge developed by Cor-Bon in partnership with the Smith & Wesson “X-Gun” engineering team for use in the Smith & Wesson Model 500 X-frame revolver and introduced in February 2003 at the SHOT show. Its primary design purpose was as a hunting handgun cartridge capable of taking all North American game species.

 

Partial source wikipedia

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